Buyer Resources - Articles

Home Inspections / "Physical Inspection"

What's a home inspection? 
A paid professional inspector -- sometimes a contractor or engineer, but always licensed for such work -- inspects the home, searching for defects or other problems that might plague the owner later on.  They usually represent, and are paid for by the Buyer. The inspection takes place after a purchase contract between buyer and seller has been signed.      In some cases, owners/sellers prefer to have a Physical Inspection and report done before marketing their home, to prevent surprises later on.

What types of 'problems' are reported?  You can usually expect reported items ranging from drippy faucets, inoperative or improperly grounded wall plugs/switches, or evidence of past leaks in the attic - to code violations of wiring or plumbing.  Some features not typically covered - be sure to ask. Within 1-3 days Inspectors will provide a rather detailed report covering all levels of items noted, often with photos and indication if the item is informational or a safety hazard.  These reports can be extensive (therefore sometimes 'scary' at first site), but a good agent will help you sort through the minutia to identify potential priority items.

Do I need a home inspection?
Yes. Buying a home "as is" is a risky proposition. Major repairs on homes can amount to thousands of dollars. Plumbing, electrical and roof problems represent significant and complex systems that are expensive to fix.  As a buyer, not getting an inspection may also limit your options to request problem fixes prior to close of escrow.

How do I find a home inspector?  If you don't have an inspector in mind, I can discuss some options for local inspectors with a good reputation or point you to resources for your research.  Always ask for their license number and referrals, if you have any doubts.

If there are any repairs we wish to request of the Seller, and they agree, then we can verify them on our final walk-thru about 5 days prior to close of escrow.

Questions or concerns?  Give me a call.

The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) has developed formal inspection guidelines and a professional code of ethics for its members. Membership to ASHI is not automatic; proven field experience and technical knowledge of structures and their various systems and appliances are a prerequisite.